Why Power Toothbrushes Are Better

Features
Unless you have been living under a rock, you have noticed a growing popularity in electric tooth brushes.  You might have thought these were just a gimmick, but studies do show that electric tooth brushes do provide superior plaque removal.

Additionally, with so many different types and features available, it’s easy to find one that suits your specific oral health needs.

Superior Action
A study done in 2005 found that brushes that used rotation oscillation removed more plaque and reduced gingivitis significantly more than with manual brushes.

Ease of Use
It goes without saying that a power toothbrushes offer a convenience factor that manual brushes do not.  A manual tooth brush requires manual action back and forth along your teeth; and many people do not brush their teeth in the correct manner.  Power toothbrushes take all of the manual action and guess work out of brushing.  You can always feel comfortable that your teeth are getting a thorough cleaning every time you brush.

Features
Power tooth brushes are full of features to make them even easier to use.  Most come with a charging holder that conveniently sits on the counter and charges them when they are not in use.  They generally come with a full array of features including: interchangeable heads with varying bristle stiffness, varying brushing modes for sensitive teeth and gum messaging action, pressure sensors to signal when you are brushing too hard, and digital reminders of when you need to change your head.

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Soda’s Effect on our Teeth

Soda has been known to be an unhealthy drink and it’s detrimental effects on teeth should not come to any surprise.  But you may be surprised on what exactly it does to your teeth.
Soda has the potential to do significant damage to your teeth.  Research has been done on this issue and some studies found that it may be just as corrosive to your teeth as drinking battery acid.  Even more startling is that the damaging effects can begin their destructive process in as little as 3 minutes after consumption.

Sugar creates a problem with the teeth because it fosters bacteria growth.  These bacteria produce acid and it is this acid that causes tooth decay. To add insult to injury, most soda’s contain phosphoric acid which is also damaging to the teeth’s enamel.  This is the same substance that dentists use as an etching solution to clean and scour your teeth prior to putting on braces or applying fillings.  Although the phosphoric acid in dental applications is a lot stronger than what you find in sodas, it still should be avoided none the less.  Since tooth erosion causes hypersensitivity and can be far more serious than tooth decay.

The last thing is to be aware of is cavities and staining.  Soda adds layers of sugars to your teeth that turn into plaque.  In time this produces an unsightly yellow shade to your teeth. So what can be done to prevent this from happening?  The most obvious answer is to stop consuming foods that are harmful to your teeth.  Also avoid energy drinks as these have as much sugar or more than soda. If you must drink soda, drink it with a straw to protect your teeth and rinse your teeth out with mouthwash after drinking. It is important to take good care of your dental health.  Teeth are one of the few places on our body that cannot easily heal themselves.

Need A Filling – Don’t Worry its Almost Painless

Unfortunately, tooth decay is a part of life for most of us; and at that point a filling is necessary to prevent further damage.

When You Need a Filling
Many people have lots of anxiety about going to the dentist; however, the fact is in recent advancements in dental technology the process of getting a filling has become nearly painless.

Expectations
The first thing that needs to be done when you suspect a cavity is to schedule a visit with your dentist. He will most likely examine the tooth, press on it a little bit; and take x-rays. Also if you do need a filling, you should have a conversation with your dentist about what sort of filling is going to be used. There are a lot more option in fillings then there were a decade ago. They vary in appearance, cost, and function, so the best option needs to be discussed. Some different fillings available are gold, amalgam, composite, ceramic, and glass ionomers.

Anesthesia
When the time arrives to get your filling the dentist will numb the area with some anesthesia. Dentists attempt to make the procedure as comfortable and painless as possible. Often times they will use a rub to numb the pain from the shot that they use to inject the anesthesia.

Types of Drills
When the area is numb, the dentist will remove the decayed portion of the tooth with a specialized instrument. What they will use will depend on the severity, most often it is a drill but more dentists are beginning to use other methods such as air abrasion and lasers.

Air abrasion is a newer technique that uses a handheld device that spays a very small stream of aluminum oxide onto the decayed portion. This is typically used for small cavities and is a painless procedure.

Cleaning
After the cavity is cleaned out, your dentist will clean the area. Additionally, if the cavity is deap they may put a liner over the cavity before applying the filling. This is done to protect the nerve.

Polishing
Once the filling is installed your dentist will clean and polish your filling. You will feel numb for a couple hours after your dentist visit, but after that you will be back to normal and pain free.

Baby Dental Care

Statistics
Children’s dental health is extremely important. A study was conducted and it found that tooth decay was the single most common chronic childhood disease, millions of school hours are lost each because of dental related issues, and it found that the poor are two times as likely to suffer from dental problems then the wealthy.
With these statistics it is very important to place an emphasis on children’s oral care.

Before the Teeth Come In
Often times, babies dental care gets neglected. This happens mostly due to lack of information and education about the issue. Babies do have dental needs, even without teeth. Plaque still grows in their mouths just as it does in anyone else’s.

To prevent plaque from building up, pediatrics suggest that parents should clean the infants gums with a damp washcloth after the feedings. Also make sure to take measures to prevent baby bottle tooth decay. This is a disease that happens in about 15% of children, and causes rapid baby tooth decay. It is important to make sure to avoid sugary products; even some formulas contain sugar. The more the baby teeth come in contact with sugar the more likely you will run into problems down the road.

How to Take Care of Baby Teeth
When the first teeth come in, it is important to schedule you first dental appointment. You should to get into a regular dental routine to prevent cavities and tooth decay, which are common in baby teeth.

Babies Need Special Attention
Babies do need some special attention when it comes to their dental health, when you do brush them make sure to use an extra-soft bristle tooth brush until your child gets over the age of 3. You should use a baby toothpaste that is safe to swallow, that is fluoride free and does not contain artificial preservatives or colors.

What to expect during an oral cancer exam

The statistics on oral cancer are frightening: More than 7,500 people will die this year from oral cancer, and another 35,000 people will be diagnosed, according to the National Institutes of Health. Even more, the five-year survival rate for patients diagnosed with oral cancer is only 60 percent, and experts warn that the disease can spread throughout the body at a fast pace. For this reason, early diagnosis and treatment is crucial. At your regular appointment, your dentist may conduct an exam to check for the presence of cancer. Read on to learn what to expect.

Before the exam, your dentist will ask you to remove any dentures and relax so your face, neck, lips, and mouth can be checked. The dentist will then use his hands to feel for any lumps under your jaw or along the side of your neck. He will also look at your tongue and the inside of your cheeks and lips for any noticeable signs of cancer, including red and white patches, swelling, or an abnormal texture. Next, the dentist will use gauze to gently move your tongue so he can see the underside and base of the tongue. Finally, the roof and floor of your mouth, as well as the back of your throat, will also be examined.

The entire exam takes only a few minutes and is entirely painless. Fortunately, this simple procedure can also help save your life. To learn more about the risks and symptoms, or request an oral cancer screening, talk to a dentist on your True Dental Discounts – dental plan.

What to expect after your root canal

Endodontic treatments – better known as root canals – have a bad reputation. But thanks to modern medicine, anesthetics can be applied before the procedure to eliminate a patient’s pain. Once patients get home, though, it is up to them to be aware of important practices that will help ensure the health of their teeth and a quick recovery.

According to the American Association of Endodontists, treated teeth may be sensitive for a few days after the procedure. This is particularly true for teeth that were painful prior to the treatment. Fortunately, most discomfort can be relieved with a simple over-the-counter pain medication or prescription drug. Be aware that the affected tooth may feel different for awhile; however, if you have long-lasting severe pain, it is important to schedule an appointment with your dentist for an exam.

Remember: Root canal treatments require a second appointment to fully repair the tooth with a crown or other restoration. Until you have completed this process, do not chew or bite with the untreated tooth, as it is at increased risk of fracturing. In most cases, teeth that undergo endodontic treatment are fully restored and will last as long as natural teeth. Rarely, teeth may need additional treatment if they become deeply decayed or experience another trauma. For more information about root canals, talk to a dentist on your True Care Advantage plan. He or she can evaluate your teeth and recommend the appropriate procedure to protect your oral health.

Does your child need braces?

One of the benefits of taking your child to see the dentist regularly is that he or she can monitor your child’s teeth and alert you to the need for orthodontic treatment. Parents can also look for warning signs so they are prepared to ask the dentist about any problematic teeth or mouth structures. The American Association of Orthodontists suggests all children should be evaluated by the age of 7 to determine the need or timeline for orthodontic treatment. It is important to talk to your child’s dentist about your options if you notice any of the following signs:

  • Crowded/overlapped teeth or highly separated teeth
  • Upper and lower teeth do not touch when chewing
  • Upper front teeth fall behind the bottom teeth when chewing
  • Upper front teeth extend too far over the bottom teeth when chewing, or protrude at an odd angle
  • Lower jaw shifts to one side when chewing

In addition, if your child still sucks his or her thumb after age 6 or so, there may be an increased risk for crooked teeth. The same goes for people who experience early or late loss of baby teeth and consistently breathe through their mouths. Ask your child’s dentist if it’s time for an orthodontic review. By staying aware of these signs and communicating with your dentist, you can make sure your child gets the treatment she needs at the correct time.

Is there too much sugar in your diet?

We all know that eating a lot of sugar can have negative effects on our physical health. It can cause weight gain, energy swings and a weakened immune system. But what effects does sugar have on your oral health? According to the American Dental Association, when bacteria/plaque comes into contact with sugar in a person’s mouth, the acid that gets produced can damage teeth for 20 minutes or longer. Over time, this damage results in tooth decay. In addition, foods that are high in sugar are often filled with empty calories and lack other nutrients that are good for your health.

These sugary foods can lead to poor nutrition, which the ADA suggests can lead to faster progression of gum disease. Dietary habits are often developed in childhood, so it’s especially important for adults to teach their kids to eat healthily and get plenty of fruits, vegetables and calcium from a young age. Other precautionary steps include drinking a lot of water, limiting snacks in between meals, brushing twice a day, flossing, and visiting the dentist regularly. It may also help to keep track of all the food you eat so you can chart your progress and notice patterns of sugary food consumption. Talk to your dentist about your eating habits and develop a plan to cut back on sugar-filled foods. It’s a commitment that will benefit your body and your teeth!

The advantages of X-rays at the dentist

If you’ve ever seen an X-ray photo of your mouth, you’ve probably noticed that your teeth appear much lighter than the rest of the surfaces. This is because X-rays cannot penetrate hard surfaces like teeth as easily as they can gums and tissue. But why is it so important to get these high-tech photos of your mouth? The main reason is because many oral health problems cannot easily be detected during a normal examination. It’s possible for a patient to have spots of decay that are not visible to the dentist. By looking at an X-ray, dentists can look for signs of decay between teeth, gum disease, bone infections, and many other serious conditions, including hidden tumors.

The American Dental Association suggests that children are especially good candidates for X-rays, as their teeth are still developing and are more prone to tooth decay. Another benefit of X-rays is that patients can save time and money by catching any hidden problems early. X-rays may even help someone avoid having to undergo the complicated procedures that advanced-stage conditions often require. Talk to your dentist about your X-ray schedule and ask if you (or your children) are due for another screening. A little extra time in the chair at your next visit could pay off dramatically down the road.

Caring for your mouth after dentures

Even though dentures are different from a person’s original teeth, it is still very important to take care of your oral health once you switch to dentures. To do this, you must first continue to brush every morning. Using a brush with soft bristles, you should brush your gums, tongue and palate to get rid of any plaque that may have settled in your mouth. Brushing also helps a person’s circulation, so it should not be skipped once dentures are worn. Second, pay attention to what you eat. Maintaining a healthy, balanced diet is a good way to ensure oral health, regardless of whether a person has dentures or not. Finally, denture-wearers must still visit the dentist regularly.

Many people make the mistake of thinking they no longer need to go to the dentist once their teeth have been removed. This is not true. The American Dental Association explains that a dentist must still check patients’ mouths for the presence of oral diseases or cancer. A dentist can also monitor the fit of dentures to make sure the patient is comfortable and has no problems eating or talking. To determine how often you need to visit the dentist, just ask him. It differs for everyone, and your dentist will be able to advise you of a proper schedule. By following these tips, you can continue to enjoy a healthy smile long into your denture years.